Anglesey Council plan to boost trade on Holyhead High Street revealed

Published date: 20 May 2014 |
Published by: Geraint Jones 
Read more articles by Geraint Jones  Email reporter


 

CARS could be allowed back on to Holyhead’s Market Street to give high street shops a boost.

The street was originally pedestrianised in the 1990s but recent calls for the decision to be reversed have led Anglesey Council to review the decision.

An Anglesey Council spokesman said: “Our aim is to try and improve access to businesses and increase footfall into the town centre and give shops a boost.

"It’s important to stress, however, that if the scheme did go ahead, the street would need to be resurfaced, which would mean significant disruption during the work.”

Cars are prohibited on Market Street from 11am tp 4.30pm, with access for loading / unloading and disabled drivers outside these hours.

The proposals, which would exclude Monday market days, are similar to recent changes on Stanley Street.

Businesses, shoppers and residents are being asked to attend a public consultation at the Internet Café at 50 Market Street, between 1pm and 4pm on Wednesday, May 28.

The spokesman added: “We’re encouraging people and local businesses to attend the consultation, look at our proposals for Market Street and let us know what they think.”

“If there is general support for the scheme, then we’ll look in more detail securing funding together with detailed designs and other safety considerations.”

Ann Roberts, of Smile Please Photo Studio, said: “It’s absolutely fantastic. It’s been a long time coming and it absolutely should go ahead.”

Anglesey Council has introduced more parking spaces on Williams Street - when it became one way - and also on lower Market Street, by making changes to bus drop-off arrangements.

For more information, contact Catherine Camara on 01248 752322 or email ccxht@anglesey.gov.uk
 

For more news from across the region visit newsnorthwales.co.uk

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